Are you ready to jump on the tax-exempt bond bandwagon? Over the last eight years, the landscape of tax-exempt bond financing has changed and more and more bonds are being sold directly to banks across the nation.

Do you have customers or potential customers that are: hospitals, health centers, visiting nurses associations, nursing homes, assisted living facilities, continuing care retirement communities, child care organizations, colleges, universities, private independent schools, museums, theaters, zoos, adult day care facilities, boys & girls clubs, community action agencies, and social service agencies?

Continue Reading The Bond Bandwagon

Massachusetts is notorious for having hyper-technical rules about notarization.  The trouble started in 2009 with the bankruptcy case of Matthew H. Giroux.  Mr. Giroux signed a mortgage in front of a notary public.  He acknowledged to the notary public that he signed the mortgage voluntarily for its stated purpose.  The notary public signed where he was supposed to, affixed his notarial seal, and inserted the expiration of his commission.  The mortgage was then recorded in the appropriate registry of deeds.  The notary public, however, forgot to insert Mr. Giroux’s name in the certificate of acknowledgement (the notary block on the mortgage); so it said: “[B]efore me personally appeared _____________ to me known to be the person (or persons) described in and who executed the foregoing instrument . . . .”  The bankruptcy court didn’t like that and invalidated the mortgage.

Ok, lesson learned.  Notaries—don’t forget to fill in the name of the person who signed the mortgage.

Continue Reading New Forms May Alleviate Some Concerns About Massachusetts Notarizations

Last week, a Texas federal judge temporarily blocked the federal Department of Labor’s proposed overtime regulation that would have increased the number of employees eligible for overtime pay by increasing the salary level for the “white collar” exemptions to $47,476 per year.

Under the FLSA, employees must be paid time and a half of the employee’s regular hourly rate for each hour worked over 40 hours a week, unless the employee falls within an exemption from overtime by meeting the criteria for salary and duties.  As it stands, to qualify for a white collar exemption, the employee must meet the minimum salary level of $455 per week or $23,660 per year.  The proposed regulation would have doubled that minimum salary level, allowing fewer employees to be exempt. The regulation would have also raised the salary used for “Highly Compensated Employees” from the current threshold of $100,000 to the 90th percentile of average weekly salaried earnings – about $122,000.

Continue Reading DOL’s New Overtime Regulation Will NOT Go in to Effect on December 1

Imagine applying for a mortgage or commercial loan on Amazon or shopping for a checking account via an App on your Iphone. As many in the financial services industry may already know, there are a new brand of startups known as “Fintech” companies who are rapidly becoming viable alternatives to traditional wealth management. “Fintech,” which is abbreviated from financial technology, are various startup companies who are utilizing technology to make traditional financial services more efficient – for example, mobile payments, money transfers, loans, fundraising and asset management. Fintech companies can provide users with a variety of financial services that were once exclusively within the purview of a traditional bank (from facilitating investments, financial planning to underwriting). Fintech startups are geared towards giving the consumer a more personalized and efficient product than currently exists. If the trends continue, Fintech companies will cause the technological areas of consumer banking to undergo significant changes.

Continue Reading Swimming with the “Fintechs”– an insight into the future of Financial Technology Companies